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Digests » 162

.net

Practical Parallelization in C# with MapReduce, ProducerConsumer and ActorModel

The barrier of entry into multi-threading in .NET is relatively low as both Parallel Computing (making programs run faster) and Concurrent Programming (making programs more responsive) have been greatly simplified since the introduction of TPL and its friends (Parallel and PLINQ) in .NET4.0.

Design patterns for microservices

The AzureCAT patterns & practices team has published nine new design patterns on the Azure Architecture Center. These nine patterns are particularly useful when designing and implementing microservices. The increased interest in microservices within the industry was the motivation for documenting these patterns.

Experimental UI framework running .NET in the browser

The arrival of WebAssembly creates the possibility of building client-side web applications using languages and runtimes that are more typically used for native app development. Blazor runs .NET code in the browser via a small, portable .NET runtime called DotNetAnywhere (DNA) compiled to WebAssembly. The programming model will be familiar to anyone who's worked with Razor (the C#/HTML page format used by ASP.NET MVC and ASP.NET Pages).

Performance Improvements in RyuJIT in .NET Core and .NET Framework

RyuJIT is the just-in-time compiler used by .NET Core on x64 and now x86 and by the .NET Framework on x64 to compile MSIL bytecode to native machine code when a managed assembly executes. I’d like to point out some of the past year’s improvements that have gone into RyuJIT, and how they make the generated code faster.

ConcurrentDictionary allocates … a lot

I was inspecting the latest build of Paint.NET with SciTech Memory Profiler  and noticed that there were a lot of System.Object allocations. Thousands of them … then, tens of thousands of them … and when I had opened 100 images, each of which were 3440×1440 pixels, I had over 800,000 System.Objects on the heap. That’s ridiculous! Not only do those use up a ton of memory, but they can really slow down the garbage collector. (Yes, they’ll survive to gen2 and live a nice quiet retired life, for the most part … but they also have to first survive a gen0 and then a gen1 collection.)

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